Get Smart About Smartphones

With flexible working schedules, remote teams and Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policies in force, it is has become commonplace for employees and business owners alike to use smartphones for work purposes. A quick reply to an email, sharing that sales presentation, glancing over that vendor proposal–all on a smartphone–is something we all do on a daily basis.

Managing BYOD Policies: Bring Your Own Device

Managing BYOD Policies: Bring Your Own Device

Workplaces today have changed. They extend beyond the working hours, beyond the cubicles. Whether you are commuting to work or even vacationing, chances are you or your employees take a break from the break to reply to those important emails that require ‘immediate action’. Plus, there may even be employees who are not even on the same continent as you.

The Advantages of BYOD

The Advantages of BYOD
Bring Your Own Device, or BYOD, to work was an idea a few years ago that is becoming a reality very fast. To use your personal smartphone, tablet or laptop for work seems increasingly natural. Employees are embracing this concept without any serious reservations.

Data Protection and BYOD Policies

Data Protection and BYOD Policies
BYOD policies refer to a firm's rules and procedures of allowing employees to use their own personal phones, tablets, and laptops for all their work applications. This is a pretty common policy, and it has many benefits, but it brings along risks.

The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly: Bring Your Own Device

There are a lot of advantages to mobility in today’s workforce, but the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) movement has also brought its share of headaches as well.

We live in a society where everyone must have the newest technology. We are inundated with ads reminding us that the smartphone or tablet we just bought a year ago is outdated and inferior to the upgrade that just hit the market.